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Linen & Lace: A French Provincial Garden Party Fundraiser

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Linen & Lace: A French Provincial Garden Party Fundraiser

August 25 @ 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

$40 – $50
Chateau Douillett - 400 Maple Street, Springfield

Join us for the Springfield Preservation Trust’s Annual Garden Party Fundraiser, featuring music, hors d’oeuvres, wine, beverages, and a gorgeous formal garden setting at Le’ Chateau Douillett, the bed and breakfast and events venue at 400 Maple Street, courtesy of homeowner and host Cheryl Duyette.

Summer linen and lace encouraged, to celebrate the “Linen & Lace: A French Provincial Garden Party Fundraiser” theme!

About the Home & Gardens

Built in 1929, 400 Maple Street is historically known as the Clarence Schoo House—the mansion is Springfield’s only example of a French Provincial house and was one of the last large homes to be built in what is now recognized as the Maple Hill Historic District. French Provincial style was popular in the period between the two world wars and is usually reserved for people of wealth. The grandeur of the home translates, too, to its formal gardens.

Nestled behind the grand chateau, the home’s formal French Provincial garden is characterized by its symmetrical and geometric design, meticulous layout, and use of hedges, topiaries, statues, and water features. In the heart of this garden stands a magnificent marble fountain, a centerpiece exuding grace and grandeur. Carved with intricate detail, water cascades from the fountain’s tiers into a pristine basin below, creating a serene melody that intermingles with the garden’s tranquility. Bluestone pathways guide visitors through meticulously manicured lawns and immaculate parterres adorned with vibrantly colored flowers, including roses, irises, wisteria, hydrangeas, tulips, echinacea, lavender, and daisies, among many more varieties.

“The plantings of a French Provincial property are usually heavily weighted in evergreens as well as flowers that are blue, purple and white,” Duyette shares. She keeps a garden log book of plantings in the library, tracking how various flora are performing on the estate. Stroll the grounds to see how many you can identify.

The garden epitomizes the elegance and precision associated with the French formal gardening style, showcasing meticulous design elements and an exquisite balance between natural beauty and human craftsmanship.

Support the Springfield Preservation Trust in its mission to preserve and protect properties in Springfield, Massachusetts which have architectural, historic, educational, or general cultural significance—including properties such as this one!—by attending our Annual Garden Party Fundraiser this year!

More about this Historic Home

400 Maple Street is two stories in height, smoothly stuccoed and topped off with a slate, hipped roof. The windows of the second story have fine, wrought iron balconies, and there are large patios in the front and rear of the house, accessible via large French doors. The original owners were Clarence J. and Grace H. Schoo. Clarence came to Springfield in 1920 and founded the General Fibre Box Co. He was intimately involved with the Eastern States Exposition, serving as a trustee since 1926. As a benefactor of Springfield College, he gave the classroom-science building which was dedicated in 1963 as the Clarence and Grace School Hall. Mr. Schoo was a lifelong friend of professional golfer Bobby Jones, with whom he was a founding member of the Augusta National Golf Club. He frequently played there with President Eisenhower, who affectionately referred to Clarence as “Schooey.”

The house is set on an acre of land that is beautifully landscaped. This was formerly part of the John Ames estate and was separated for the construction of this house. It was built in 1929 from designs of Boston architect John Barnard, at the cost of $45,000.

Organizer

Springfield Preservation Trust
Phone
(413) 747-0656

Venue

Le’ Chateau Douillett
400 Maple Street
Springfield, MA 01105 United States
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